Understanding the Brain – 8 Must Read Neuroscience Books

Understanding the brain using the latest research in neuroscience is undeniably the best way to understand yourself. By knowing why you do the things that you do, and what neurological basis this has, is a great way to overcome your body and regain control over your emotions and actions.

Self control and self discipline are key to achieving success, and by understanding the brain, you can understand what drives us, what makes us do what we do, and how we can improve our cognitive capabilities.

8 Must Read Neuroscience Books

By understanding the concepts in these books, which deal with the structure or function of the nervous system and brain, you will get a better understanding of yourself and what makes you behave the way you do in different circumstances.

1. The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales – Oliver Sacks

The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales

Oliver Sacks’s The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat tells the stories of individuals afflicted with fantastic perceptual and intellectual aberrations.

Inconceivably strange, these brilliant tales are deeply human. They are studies of life struggling against incredible adversity, and they enable us to enter the world of the neurologically impaired, to imagine with our hearts what it must be to live and feel as they do.

2. The Brain That Changes Itself: Stories of Personal Triumph from the Frontiers of Brain Science – Norman Doidge

The Brain That Changes Itself: Stories of Personal Triumph from the Frontiers of Brain Science - Norman Doidge

From stroke patients learning to speak again to the remarkable case of a woman born with half a brain that rewired itself to work as a whole, The Brain That Changes Itself will permanently alter the way we look at our brains, human nature, and human potential.

3. Phantoms in the Brain: Probing the Mysteries of the Human Mind – V.S. Ramachandran

Phantoms in the Brain: Probing the Mysteries of the Human Mind - V.S. Ramachandran

In Phantoms in the Brain, Dr. Ramachandran recounts how his work with patients who have bizarre neurological disorders has shed new light on the deep architecture of the brain, and what these findings tell us about who we are, how we construct our body image, why we laugh or become depressed, why we may believe in God, how we make decisions, deceive ourselves and dream, perhaps even why we’re so clever at philosophy, music and art.

4. Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain – David Eagleman

Incognito The Secret Lives of the Brain

Taking in brain damage, plane spotting, dating, drugs, beauty, infidelity, synesthesia, criminal law, artificial intelligence, and visual illusions, Incognito is a thrilling subsurface exploration of the mind and all its contradictions.

5. Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain – Oliver Sacks

Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain (Hardcover) by Oliver Sacks

Oliver Sacks’s compassionate, compelling tales of people struggling to adapt to different neurological conditions have fundamentally changed the way we think of our own brains, and of the human experience.

In Musicophilia, he examines the powers of music through the individual experiences of patients, musicians, and everyday people—from a man who is struck by lightning and suddenly inspired to become a pianist at the age of forty-two, to an entire group of children with Williams syndrome, who are hypermusical from birth; from people with “amusia,” to whom a symphony sounds like the clattering of pots and pans, to a man whose memory spans only seven seconds—for everything but music.

6. How the Mind Works – Steven Pinker

How the Mind Works - Steven Pinker

How the Mind Works synthesizes the most satisfying explanations of our mental life from cognitive science, evolutionary biology, and other fields to explain what the mind is, how it evolved, and how it allows us to see, think, feel, laugh, interact, enjoy the arts, and contemplate the mysteries of life.

7. Thinking, Fast and Slow – Daniel Kahneman

Thinking, Fast and Slow - Daniel Kahneman

In the international bestseller, Thinking, Fast and Slow, Daniel Kahneman, the renowned psychologist and winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics, takes us on a groundbreaking tour of the mind and explains the two systems that drive the way we think. System 1 is fast, intuitive, and emotional; System 2 is slower, more deliberative, and more logical.

8. My Stroke of Insight: A Brain Scientist’s Personal Journey – Jill Bolte Taylor

My Stroke of Insight A Brain Scientist's Personal Journey Jill Bolte Taylor

On December 10, 1996, Jill Bolte Taylor, a thirty-seven- year-old Harvard-trained brain scientist experienced a massive stroke in the left hemisphere of her brain.

As she observed her mind deteriorate to the point that she could not walk, talk, read, write, or recall any of her life-all within four hours-Taylor alternated between the euphoria of the intuitive and kinesthetic right brain, in which she felt a sense of complete well-being and peace, and the logical, sequential left brain, which recognized she was having a stroke and enabled her to seek help before she was completely lost. It would take her eight years to fully recover.

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Mehdi KA
Mehdi KA
Mehdi KA is an inspirational blogger and motivational speaker. He has traveled to over 43 countries and enjoys writing as a way to share his experiences and life lessons.
In theImportance.net he shares content that he believes can help people to achieve their goals and live a fulfilling life.

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